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Richard Buckminster Fuller: 1969 Humanist of the Year


Buckminster Fuller published more than 30 books, inventing and popularizing terms such as "Spaceship Earth", ephemeralization, and synergetic. He also developed numerous inventions, mainly architectural designs, including the widely known geodesic dome. Carbon molecules known as fullerenes were later named by scientists for their resemblance to geodesic spheres.

An impressive opening paragraph, no? But wait, there's more and I recognise a pattern.

He was expelled from Harvard twice: first for spending all his money partying with a vaudeville troupe, and then, after having been readmitted, for his "irresponsibility and lack of interest." By his own appraisal, he was a non-conforming misfit in the fraternity environment.

How many others who were considered misfits by educationalists went on to produce extraordinary successes that benefited humanity?

By age 32, Buckminster Fuller was bankrupt and jobless, living in low-income public housing in Chicago, Illinois. In 1922, Fuller's young daughter Alexandra died from complications from polio and spinal meningitis. Allegedly, he felt responsible and this caused him to drink frequently and to contemplate suicide for a while. He finally chose to embark on "an experiment, to find what a single individual [could] contribute to changing the world and benefiting all humanity."

It seems it's never too late to turn things around, and life's hard knocks can be a blessing in disguise - it's not what you see, but how you see it.

He finally chose to embark on "an experiment, to find what a single individual [could] contribute to changing the world and benefiting all humanity.

Keywords: chose, purpose, benefit, humanity

Buckminster Fuller believed human societies would soon rely mainly on renewable sources of energy, such as solar- and wind-derived electricity. He hoped for an age of "omni-successful education and sustenance of all humanity." Buckminster Fuller referred to himself as "the property of universe" and during one radio interview he gave later in life, declared himself and his work "the property of all humanity". For his lifetime of work, the American Humanist Association named him the 1969 Humanist of the Year.

We are indeed "the property of the universe", if we choose to see it so. Thanks John.

Richard Buckminster Fuller: 1969 Humanist of the Year Reviewed by Paul Simbeck-Hampson on 2:22 PM Rating: 5
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