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Enterprise Social Etiquette



Don't do social (etiquette-less), be social (with etiquette)
This show on Enterprise Social Etiquette will have the 'Through The Firewall' panellists discuss and debate the rules of etiquette needed for internal social networks and whether social really does flatten hierarchies.

Join the #SWChat community on G+ https://plus.google.com/communities/107547646751467675597

Thanks to Liz Christopher for inviting me to tonights #SWChat, and thanks to Jenn Emerson, +Amanda ColemanMark Oehlert for making me feel very welcome. It was  especially nice to finally meet Mark in the (virtual) flesh, as we've been exchanging thoughts and ideas for a few years now via Twitter; Mark, I hope it won't be so long before the next meeting!

The show is 30 minute long and covers the following three question.
Q1 Do Etiquette rules apply behind the firewall and if so what are they?



Q2 Does social really flatten hierarchy to the extent that anyone can disagree publicly with their CEO or boss?



Q3 Should employees or employers be worried of the risks social carry - for example saying the wrong thing?


Full video


---- Personal notes ----


Q1 Do Etiquette rules apply behind the firewall and if so what are they?

Wikipedia:  Etiquette is a code of behavior with precise expectations for social behavior according to contemporary conventional norms within a society, social class, or group. 

From a human point of view, we need to be consistent, same on the inside as we are on the outside (regardless of a firewall). Practising the art of being social behind the firewall can help build confidence before engaging outside the firewall. 

Some examples of bad etiquette

  • Bad Etiquette

  • Not following back,

  • Pretending to know someone,

  • Pure push marketing,

  • Engaging then ignoring,

  • Poor moderation,

  • No human Avatar

  • Not consistent,

Relationships are built on Open Communication:

  • Honesty

  • Trust

  • Confidence

  • Genuineness

 There is also an important need for filtering noise to get the signal (both in terms of content and people); we need to focus on where and who to give our time to, and where we genuinely engage to meet our goals.
Q2 Does social really flatten hierarchy to the extent that anyone can disagree publicly with their CEO or boss?

 From Harold Jarche:
“Leadership in networks does not come from above, as there is no top.”

1) Social networking helps to breaks down silos.

2) Conversations occurs in real time across time zones and countries. As conversation build cooperative behaviours start and the beginning of new relationships form.

3) When cooperation is established, collaboration can occur - where it is required.

4) Within such an environment serendipity flourishes and ideas are arrived at that could never have previously been arrived at.

5) Conversations are data. Being able to merge conversations (or data sets) so that they can be viewed in different ways by different people leads to innovation.

6) Social networking is the catalyst for flatter organisational structures as it enables dialogue with anyone across any department.

7) It’s not an overnight transformation though, it’s a marathon than a sprint, but it does help to shift the culture.

8) A bigger shift can occur when the c-suite lend support, the best way being to immerse themselves - though often the gap is too wide; this has the effect of motivating management to engage and so it goes on.

The business goal is ultimately faster, more accurate decisions. Enter Open, Linked, Big data... 

Q3 Should employees or employers be worried of the risks social carry - for example saying the wrong thing? 

1) In the same way they should worry in any public setting, when representing the brand.

2) Organisations need to create the environment that reduces the risks, both for the brand and the individual.

3) Clear policy and governance, and support of it, from the top down is important; it’s important because management will be motivated to coach others about it

4) Management lead the change and ultimately scale it.

5) They should really be worried about the effects of forgetting etiquette.

Final thanks to David Christopher for the post on Twitter:

Image source: Muffet / Foter.com / CC BY
Enterprise Social Etiquette Reviewed by Paul Simbeck-Hampson on 2:21 AM Rating: 5
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